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20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
the services fleet forces command before becoming the first submariner in nearly two decadeses to hold the navy's top job. he was vice chief of the navy where he helped shaped joint strategies and budgets and the fate of acquisition programs. but the navy he leads faces challenges. deployments are getting longer, suicides are on the rise, commanders are being fired at near record levels, ship costs are soaring and budget cuts are coming. admiral greenert, it's an honor to have you on the program. >> thank you for having me. >> what sequestration planning are you doing? i know you've been thinking about it for a long time and where are you going to cut if you have to come up with more money as almost everybody expects as part of a budget deal? >> well, we still remain in a, if you will, a thinking phase. we will be given guidance on precisely where to take the reductions but it's relatively clear. military personnel has been exempt. we've asked for that and we got that. that's the right thing to do. it's -- sequestration is an algorithm. the deal is those directed cuts in every budget line and p
from being settled there. and let me take that navy as an example, which will be illustrative of the other forces and what it will do to the navy. it will take the navy and drive it down to the smallest force it has had since prior to world war one. not world war ii, lou. world war one. lou: you know, i'm sorry, admiral. when governor romney said that, pointed that out to president obama in the debate, he was -- we had horses and bayonets, too. he seemed to make light of that. how important is it? can you give us a sense of the impact? >> i think the president's comment is showing his inexperience in military matters. in this particular case we are going down to 220 ships. to put that number in perspective, i had 2505 ships under my command in the pacific flees. 20 percent of those 220 ships will be the literal combat ships which basically have no offensive or defensive capability. we are going to be challenged where we show weakness. and let me give you an example. just today china announced effective january 1 they have authorized their paramilitary naval forces and their po
a sense of what relationships washington has with india and what would be priorities for both india navy? [inaudible] how is it going to help? >> let me start with your last question first. as far as the indian ocean organization that you related to that we are, we're not a part of but we are invited as an observer to it, but in general, throughout the into pacific region, first, you have to understand the breadth and scope of that region. is well over half the people in the world living in that region. all the major economies are in that region, including ours. seven of the 10 largest armies in that region. you can put all the comments in the world in the pacific ocean, put all of them in the pacific ocean and still have room for another africa, another candidate, another united states, another mexico. that's just in the pacific. the indian ocean is vast as will fix we have this really large, very dynamic, can't even call it a region. it's half the world, where you have historical ties between countries, bilateral, multilateral, and you have this, there is no one security organization t
from alaska good up, beverly moore, 81-year-old korean war navy veteran. beverly was there because the majority of her modest income comes from social security. she wanted to know how this proposal will strengthen that lifeline for her and thousands of alaskans. in fact, one in nine alaskans receive social security. with my state's population of those 65 and older expanding rapidly, social security will continue to play a key role in supplementing a decent living. if social security was not there for the elderly in alaska, a fifth of them would live below poverty. it's vital for our state. it's vital for all our states and for this whole country. mr. president, i have no illusions that this bill is not going to pass in the final weeks of the 112th congress, but i wanted to get it into the mix, i wanted to make sure that people get the bigger point, and again i would say to my presiding officer -- and he says as well and i know my friend here from oregon is on the floor also. as we talk about the deficit, it has taken center stage right now, we want to highlight one very clear thing
at the army navy club here in washington, d.c., and it is a great pleasure to have with us today some of our real national treasures. and certainly lieutenant colonel, promotable trantor is among them -- j. b. vowell is among them. the tenant colonel vowell commander province called task force no slack which i think is really a phenomenal italian name, and also think it was a phenomenal italian -- [inaudible] in some of those difficult -- and one of the most difficult environments. lieutenant colonel vowell ripeness at stanford university doing his work college fellowship. [inaudible] >> cooperation spent all right. center for international security and cooperation. want to get your stanford bosses to let you come out here today. very, very happy. he's working on a thesis right now on afghanistan after 2014. but, of course, i got to know him while he was deployed in afghanistan, and got to visit his battalion. first, while he was out where we met, joe holiday at the time the no slack, and now the study of war, then again in february of 2011 at a commanders conference held by the colonel who
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)